main-background new title lpt The Fucking Golden years poster

 

         THE GOLDEN F**KING YEARS by Adrian McLoughlin

         Brockley Jack Theatre, SE4, 17 – 28 April 2018

 

Vital Signs Productions debut their hilarious new play about getting old, moving abraod and the consequences of spontaneous behaviour.  They are  challenging the perception that age dictates behaviour.  We ask company member’s Adrian McLoughlin, Anneli Page and Deborah Maclaren five pertinent (or impertinent) questions about growing old.

 

Playwright, and actor Adrian McLoughlin

 

Q. Older people who feel young at heart are having better sex lives (so says the Daily Mail). Is it true and do we really want to see it?

Adrian: I’m not! Perhaps I need to start reading the Daily Mail. No that’s not going to happen so I’ll see if the Guardian can help. As for seeing sex among an older generation on stage – well why not? After all they do have sex apparently – just ask the Daily Mail. You won’t see any in our first play but I’m thinking about the next one right now …

What is a 'senior moment' and is it something to be proud of?

A senior moment is something a bit stupid that you’ve been doing all your life but now you’ve got grey hair – or, in my case, no hair.

Vital Signs conjures up exactly where your company is coming from championing older actors and themes, but what does it mean to you?

Vital Signs Productions is about perception in relation to older people and how it can limit us and limit society. We should – and can – continue to develop and create until the day we die and we aim to show this in our productions and projects. Reject limitation wherever you can.

4.  At what age do we become 'older' in life and in the theatre profession?

“Older” is just a word. We become “older” statistically every minute of every day but basically we’re people who’ve been around longer. We carry on doing what we do and change our habits only when we physically or mentally have to but “older” is a word for others to use positively or negatively and not one I’m interested in personally. In the theatre it might be about no longer being able to be sexy in the eyes of the audience I guess, so it works in favour of those of us who perhaps never were …

5.  Finally, what are you really looking forward to sharing with an audience?

An exciting and enjoyable look at the different ways – both positive and negative - that people experience getting older. I want to give the audiences a good time and some food for thought. And if we help a few people rethink what they can get out of their lives or how they view others then that will be fantastic.

 

the golden f - adrian

 

"Vital Signs Productions is about perception in relation to older people and how it can limit us and limit society ... Reject limitation wherever you can."

Actor Deborah Maclaren

 

Q. Older people who feel young at heart are having better sex lives (so says the Daily Mail). Is it true and do we really want to see it?

Deborah: Sounds like something the Daily Mail would come out with! I guess the problem with Gordon and Helen in 'The Golden F**king Years' is that they've lost any sense of intimacy, physically and emotionally and certainly Helen is very aware of her own sexuality.  I personally think we should stop being surprised by it. And I promise everything thing you see on stage is done in subtle lighting  with underwear on!

What is a 'senior moment' and is it something to be proud of?

A 'senior moment' is probably a bit like a 'blonde moment' - just one of those phrases! Would it include frequently finding my glasses in the fridge?

Vital Signs conjures up exactly where your company is coming from championing older actors and themes, but what does it mean to you?

For me, the importance of Vital Signs Productions is threefold. We're opening up the debate and challenging stereotypes about older people hopefully in a bold and entertaining way. Secondly, I'm lucky enough to play a wonderful and very funny part written for me by my best mate and thirdly we're forcing Adrian at the age of 71 to keep writing when he probably wants to go back to Costa Rica.

At what age do we become 'older' in life and in the theatre profession?

I really don't know what age we become old in life - maybe it's when you stop seeing possibilities, or your joints seize up. Some people are just born old. But in our profession the rules are different. You're old at 40! I was described as 'an ageing prostitute ' in a film once and I was 37. And I wasn't even playing a prostitute.

Finally, what are you really looking forward to sharing with an audience?

I really want the audience to have a good time watching 'The Golden F**king Years'  Hopefully older audience members will recognise things in themselves and the younger ones will see older people through different eyes. But the important thing is to realise that people, no matter what age, can really mess up. The play is warm and witty and has some huge laughs in it. It presents two people facing growing older in very different ways to each other and the challenges that can bring to a long relationship. And it's done with truth. So enjoy!

 

 

 

 

THE GOLDEN F**KING YEARS 

by Adrian McLoughlin

Brockley Jack Theatre, SE4, 17 – 28 April 7.30pm (no performance Sun/Mon)

 

Box Office: www.brockleyjack.co.uk

or 0333 666 3366

(£1.50 fee for phone bookings only)

" ... in our profession the rules are different. You're old at 40! I was described as 'an ageing prostitute ' in a film once and I was 37. And I wasn't even playing a prostitute."

The Fucking Golden years deborah the golden fu anneli

Actor Anneli Page

 

Q. Older people who feel young at heart are having better sex lives (so says the Daily Mail).  Is it true and do we really want to see it? 

Anneli: Let’s take this quote with a pinch of salt…however I’d like to think it’s true – gives us all something to hope and strive for! With regards to ‘do we really want to see it’ – I’m game so long as it’s executed with good taste and a degree of humour!

What is a 'senior moment' and is it something to be proud of?

Being the youngster of the Vital Signs team at the age of 41 I’m not sure I qualify yet! But I certainly believe it’s a privilege to get old and to wear our lines, wrinkles and memory loss as a badge of honour.

Vital Signs conjures up exactly where your company is coming from championing older actors and themes, but what does it mean to you?

To constantly challenge yourself, to adapt and to embrace new and difficult chapters and to never give up on life or yourself.  

At what age do we become 'older' in life and in the theatre profession?

I loathe the word ‘older’ – it has such a negative tone to it, insinuating one is ‘on their way out’ or ‘becoming more useless/less interesting.’ Rather than becoming ‘older’ I find that as we mature human beings can decide to either develop and improve or not. I’ve met some inspirational and wise 21year olds, some fairly useless and undynamic 40year olds and some hilarious and energetic 80 years old. It’s really about the individual and their development as opposed to the number. Mostly in life and on stage you are considered past it after 40 – please god let this terrible perception change. It’s just such a waste! Particularly if we as individuals begin to believe it…….!

Finally, what are you really looking forward to sharing with an audience?

I’d love the audience to go on their own journey with these three fairly flawed characters (Gordon, Helen and Cath) in ’The Golden F**king Years’ – All feelings are welcome - annoyance, frustration, hatred, hilarity, sadness and ultimately some level of understanding being shared. We’re all human, we all make daft mistakes and we all try to our best, right? Please do come along and judge for yourself!

 

 

 

 

 

"Being the youngster of the Vital Signs team at the age of 41 I’m not sure I qualify yet! But I certainly believe it’s a privilege to get old and to wear our lines, wrinkles and memory loss as a badge of honour."